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Elevation map

Walking from Canterbury to Rome is an amazing and challenging venture. Those who decide to make it need information about the hills, mountains, plains and passes not just regarding the distances but the elevation factors as well. The PDF you can download from this page helps to get to know the elevation profile of the Via Francigena from Canterbury to Rome. The route has been split into 50-to-70-km-long chunks all the way to Rome.

What you can see in the maps:

  • start and end towns for each section, as well as the major towns between the two  
  • distance and elevation values  
  • under the elevation graph you can find the number of the map: e.g. on page 3. at the second map: "Altitude map:6" 
  • under the elevation graph you can find which sections covers the actual map. (The whole route is divided by numbered sections as KML GPS data that you can download as KML from here.) For example, on page 3, on the second map: "Sections VF16-18" means that the graph above covers the KML sections named VF16, VF17 and VF18, which you can download and study as a KML file.
  • under the number of the map you can occasionally find advice for a detour. For example, on page 3, on the second map: "To bypass 290m elevation choose: VF10A alternate route" means that to bypassing an unnecessary climb you can choose an alternative route named VF10A, which you can download and study as a KML file.

IMPORTANT: the height of the elevation maps is fixed, meaning the spikes of 500m elevation in one of the maps are at the same height as spikes of a 2000m in the other. So first study carefully the elevation scaling on the left side of the map, and make your decisions bearing that in mind.

You can download the elevation map from here (5.1 MB).